Stridekick
Bobby Reyes
Experience Designer

Stridekick

Web & iOS App

Stridekick is a device-agnostic platform, allowing people with fitness trackers and smartwatches to engage in online fitness challenges through it's web and smartphone applications.

Role:

User Research

Personas

Information Architecture

Userflows

Wireframes

User Interface Design

Prototyping

Stridekick

Stridekick

During my time at Stridekick as a UX/UI Designer, I worked on multiple products that were both consumer-facing and B2B. As part of the in-house design team, I helped create shared component libraries, conducted customer interviews, and designed user interfaces for various products.

My experience at Stridekick gave me an opportunity to work on many features and collaborate in an agile environment. While touching every stage of the design process beginning at the discovery phase to completed user interfaces. That was shipped and iterated on to create an ideal experience for our users and customers.

Stridekick
Stridekick

Competitive Analysis

To address the given challenge of implementing business-driven features for Stridekick, during my process I started with audits of various applications from the fitness industry. My aim was to gather insights about strategies and best practices when it comes to user-centred design.

There were numerous products that inhabited the same space as we did. As I researched patterns started to emerge that helped determine what were common conventions users were already familiar with.

Competitors included Fitbit, Garmin and Apple. They all offered similar features but one of our advantages was that our platform wasn't reliant on users owning a specific device. Our platform was device agnostic meaning just about anyone could play, unlike the competition.  

Interviews

At the discovery phase of each project, I conducted user interviews in order to get a better understanding of their problems. This was a very important part of the process because we got to learn how our products were being used. While also learning peoples pain points when interacting with them. This gave us important insights into how we could design better experiences.

Digging into the why was very important because we were ultimately trying to help people change their behavior. Which is a very hard thing to do, so we needed to learn what motivated people to take action and stick to a routine. The more people we interviewed and the more iterations we made to our products patterns started to emerge about the people we were servicing.

Stridekick

Our Fitness Profiles

After numerous interviews and research, we kept seeing an emerging pattern among the companies and people who engaged with our platform. We would see the same types of profiles popping up and they became very recognizable time and time again. Based on this information we were able to develop four user profiles.

We referred to these profiles throughout the entire product development process. Not only for Stridekick but for future products. It gave us insight to our users behaviors, motivations, and how we could help them achieve thier goals.

As a team we knew the importance of empathy and how forces could derail the best laid out plans when it came to fitness. But this also helped us understand that we are each on our own path and that we have different goals and things that motivate us.

User Journey

Interviewing customers and mapping their journeys was a great way to uncover insights as to why they chose to interact with Stridekick rather than the competitors. What it revealed was that people have different needs when it comes to choosing a fitness device or app. Price, style, and usability were all very important factors but what pushed people to download Stridekick was being able to connect with friends and family that owned different devices on the same platform. It didn't matter if you owned a Fitbit and your friend had an Apple Watch because on a device agnotstic platorm like Stridekick anyone could play.

For a user trying to purchase a fitness device, the follow details may be true:

  • Context: Users want a way to get healthier and feel a fitness device will help kick start their journey. 
  • Motivation: They want support and accountability that will give them the ability to reach their fitness goal.
  • Pain Points: “Staying motivated is hard but having friends hold you accountable really helps get me moving.”
  • Mental Models: “I want to become healthier and connect with my friends who have different devices."

Stridekick

Friends Feature

Stridekick

Friends

One of the most popular features that I worked on exclusively during my time at Stridekick was the 'friends' feature. When I began the redesign of version one, users could only view how many steps their friends had taken at certain time intervals. But as we continued to utilize more API'S and pull in more data we were able to display metrics like miles and active minutes.

This also meant we could explore how we could display that data and utilizing React Native libraries like D3 which gave our users a better visual experience. Eventually, we added the ability for users to compare their stats with each other over various time because our users wanted to see how they compared with each other outside of step challenges.

Stridekick

Interviews

We were very fortunate to have a user base that wanted to talk with us and contribute to the evolution of Stridekick. After interviewing seven people it became very apparent how important the friend's feature was to people in keeping them motivated.

I also utilize Intercom to gather qualitative feedback from our users about the current friend's feature. One huge insight that emerged was that users could not find friends because it was buried in a hamburger menu.

Stridekick

Userflow

Based on the research we decided to make a major change and surface the friends feature and not hide it in the hamburger menu which would make friends more visible. Because of this decision, I devised a new user flow to make navigating easier for users.

Stridekick

Sketches

Once the user flows were defined I started my design process with low fidelity sketches of the new user interface. This allowed me to iterate through many design options quickly.

Due to some constraints, we settled on a version that would only display one bar graph and introduce a new feature that would let users compare each other's stats over time.

Stridekick

Wireframes

After settling on a version I dove into creating wireframes for testing purposes. I believe in testing often and testing early so I created more detailed wireframes in order to conduct usability testing.

This proved to be useful as I learned people really enjoyed the ability to compare their stats with each other. Also, they were able to move through the new flow pretty easily.

But the biggest pain point had to do with the modal, particularly the stats being displayed and how to select time intervals.

Stridekick

UI Design

After doing usability testing on the mid-fidelity wireframes I started designing the screens in Sketch. I paid particular attention to the compare stats modal making sure all the elements were easy to interact with. Once the UI was complete I created an interactive prototype do additional testing. From those tests, I tweaked how some of the metrics were displayed in the modal. 

*Below you can click through the final prototype of the friends feature.

Prototype

GEM Dashboard

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GEM - Client Admin

While Stridekick was a consumer-facing app we did have B2B products that were a big part of our revenue stream. One of those products was GEM (Groups Experience Manager) which was used by clients that utilized Stridekick as an engagement tool with employees.

*I cannot show the entirety of this project so I will only be able to share my work on the dashboard. 

Stridekick


Interviews

During my time at Stridekick, we had over 100 clients who used our platform as an engagement tool. The people running the programs needed their own application to track their employee's progress through the challenges we created. The first version of the client admin application needed to be redesigned to serve the new needs of our customers.

I had many conference calls with various clients who ran these programs and they all wanted to be able to digest their data in an easy way. We were very lucky to have so many clients that were willing to be interviewed and we learned a lot about what sort of features and metrics were most important to them.

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Wireframes

A lot of iteration and testing was put into the designing of the GEM dashboard. I created numerous widgets that displayed various metrics that could be plugged right in. But due to technical constraints, we were able to keep some and discard others.

Because the new dashboard needed to provide a better visual experience I did the bulk of usability testing when I created high fidelity mockups. It needed to feel like the real thing because it would be the admin's who I would be testing with.

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User Testing

After numerous iterations of the layout and widgets, we tested with multiple clients. Understanding some of the graphs proved to be difficult and didn't really tell them about how their team had improved. But the widgets highlighting specific peoples accomplishments was a hit. So it was back to the drawing board to simplify the graphs and create more widgets that gave the admins the information they needed.

Stridekick

UI Design

A lot of iteration and testing was put into the designing of the dashboard. I created numerous widgets that displayed various metrics that could be plugged right in. But due to some technical constraints we were able to keep some and discard others. We were very lucky to have so many clients that were willing to be interviewed and we learned a lot about what sort of metrics were most important to them. By speaking with our users and constant iteration we were able to provide a new experience to our clients and helped them run better engagement programs.

What I Learned

What I learned at Stridekick

My time at Stridekick was a very valuable learning experience and gave me a crash course how to design for scale on various platforms. It is a great product with a grand mission to get people to live healthier lives. Which is no easy task, because changing a persons habit or behavior is a hard thing to do.

The product is packed with a lot of powerful tools to help individuals, such as setting personal goals, tracking and logging steps and offers social fitness challenges. I am glad to have played a part in the product's evolution starting from redesigning the journey mode challenge to eventually help design an MVP that spawned from our team mode challenge.